Wednesday, 9 July 2014

Networks and Neighbours, II: Aspects of the Concept of the Roman Empire in the Early Middle Ages


N&N - IMC 2014 Session


Session1115
TitleNetworks and Neighbours, II: Aspects of the Concept of the Roman Empire in the Early Middle Ages
Date/TimeWednesday 9 July 2014: 11.15-12.45
SponsorNetworks & Neighbours Network
OrganiserIoannis Papadopoulos, School of History, University of Leeds

Catalin Taranu, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds

Otávio Luiz Vieira Pinto, School of History, University of Leeds / Coordenação de aperfeiçoamento de pessoal de nível superior (CAPES)
Moderator/ChairLucy Grig, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1115-a Empire in the Anglo-Saxon Imagination
(Language: English)
Catalin Taranu, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index Terms: Language and Literature - Latin; Language and Literature - Old English; Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1115-b The Concept of the Roman Empire in Augustine's City of God
(Language: English)
Ioannis Papadopoulos, School of History, University of Leeds
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Theology
Paper 1115-c City of God, City of Goths: The Rhetoric of Empire between Augustine of Hippo and Cassiodorus Senator
(Language: English)
Otávio Luiz Vieira Pinto, School of History, University of Leeds / Coordenação de aperfeiçoamento de pessoal de nível superior (CAPES)
Index Terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Political Thought; Theology
AbstractEmpire is first of all a place in the mind. In Augustine's theology, in Cassiodorus's political thought or in Anglo-Saxon legendary retellings of Roman history, the Roman Empire is explained, reinterpreted, fictionalized, and projected upon. The Empire is transformed in its turn by these texts: it is given theoretical foundations and political direction; it is even resurrected as legend of times past. This panel focuses on the complex interactions between the ideas and realities of the Empire. The three papers seek to uncover the subtle dynamics of mythical past, pragmatic present and utopian future in conceptualizing the Roman Imperium at three discreet times.