Wednesday, 9 July 2014

Networks and Neighbours, I: Roman Provincial Capitals of Hispania after the Empire - Tarraco, Emerita, and Corduba




N&N - IMC 2014 Session


Session1015
TitleNetworks and Neighbours, I: Roman Provincial Capitals of Hispania after the Empire - Tarraco, Emerita, and Corduba
Date/TimeWednesday 9 July 2014: 09.00-10.30
SponsorNetworks & Neighbours Network / Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona
OrganiserMeritxell Pérez Martínez, Departament d'Història i Història de l'Art, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona
Moderator/ChairIan N. Wood, School of History, University of Leeds
Paper 1015-a A Symptomatic Reading of the Vitas Patrum Emeritensium: Mérida in Late Visigothic Spania
(Language: English)
Michael J. Kelly, School of History, University of Leeds / Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Political Thought
Paper 1015-b Cordoba: From Empire to Caliphate
(Language: English)
Ann R. Christys, Independent Scholar, Leeds
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Islamic and Arabic Studies
Paper 1015-c Medieval Tarraco between Two Empires with Enemies as Neighbours
(Language: English)
Lawrence J. McCrank, Library, Information & Media Studies, Chicago State University
Index Terms: Archaeology - General; Islamic and Arabic Studies; Politics and Diplomacy
AbstractEmpire left a deep and long-lasting impression in the territories of old Romanisation known as Roman Hispania with visible effects at all levels of human development. Even when it ceased to play a major political role in the West, Empire continued to shape political, social and cultural structures in Hispania.
The main purpose of this session is to explore the process of developing and reshaping this heritage by the political structures that succeeded the Empire in Early Medieval Hispania. It is intended to analyse this phenomenon through the evidence provided by its three historical provincial capitals: Tarraco, Emerita, and Corduba. The former Roman provincial capitals of Hispania continued to be centres of power, cities with political and ecclesiastical importance where a certain concept of civilitas survived. The legacy of the Empire in these cities will be analysed, as well as how it transformed and adapted over time facing the diverse historical developments.